Generative AI: A threat or a driver of human creativity?

Generative AI: A threat or a driver of human creativity?

Generative AI: A threat or a driver of human creativity?The rise of generative AI has made creativity a hot topic. Some worry about the possibility of machines making art, while others hail the fact that this technology can simplify the creative process. To weigh up the pros and cons, US researchers have explored generative AI’s impact on the creatives of the future ― children.

Researchers from the Universities of Washington and Michigan conducted an experiment involving a dozen children aged 7 to 13. They involved them in several 90-minute creativity sessions over a four-month period. Adults were present during these workshops to help the children use generative AI tools such as Chat-GPT, Dall-E or Magenta. For example, they had to use these programs to create a storybook from scratch.

The authors of this research, whose findings were presented in Honolulu (Hawaii) at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, noted that children had difficulty using artificial intelligence tools. They expected a lot from the generative AI programs, and struggled to explain their ideas clearly. “There’s a mismatch between what children are expecting [generative artificial intelligence] systems to be able to do and what they can do. This type of technology is generally built with adults in mind. Likewise, children’s language just isn’t the same as adults. Things like this really become an issue for kids trying to creatively express themselves,” says study coauthor, Michele Newman, quoted in a news release.

While children may struggle to use artificial intelligence to exceed their artistic potential, they don’t feel threatened by the technology. In fact, they are quite critical of its use for creative purposes. An 11-year-old boy told the researchers that he would be disappointed if he learned that his favorite book series had been written by generative AI. He even told them that it would “dismantle” his joy of reading.

While children may struggle to use artificial intelligence to exceed their artistic potential, they don’t feel threatened by the technology. In fact, they are quite critical of its use for creative purposes. An 11-year-old boy told the researchers that he would be disappointed if he learned that his favorite book series had been written by generative AI. He even told them that it would “dismantle” his joy of reading.

READ MORE:

OpenAI employees report a high-risk, punishing culture

Senior judge expects AI will change expert roles

First varsity AI faculty studies launched in Malaysia

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *